Scott Hamilton’s Story

 

 Photo posted with permission http://photoinspiration.weebly.com/index.html

 

EXERCISE FOR PEOPLE OVER 50 (or who feel like it) 
 
Begin by standing on a comfortable surface, where you have plenty of room at each side. 
 
With a 5-lb potato sack in each hand, extend your arms straight out from your sides and hold them there as long as you can. 
 
Try to reach a full minute, and then relax. Each day you’ll find that you can hold this position for just a bit longer. 
 
After a couple of weeks, move up to 10-lb potato sacks. Then try 50-lb potato sacks and then eventually try to get to where you can lift a 100-lb potato sack in each hand and hold your arms straight for more than a full minute. (My husband  is at this level.) 
 
After you feel confident at that level, put a potato in each sack. 😉

 

“God gave you a gift of 86, 400 seconds today.  Have you used one to say ‘Thank you’”? (William Ward )

Lord, every single gift comes from You…“Lift my gaze to see life from Your perspective. Help me to understand-and treasure-every good thing You send…”(From James 1:7)   One Thousand Gifts   http://www.aholyexperience.com/

820.  Beautiful account below Julie sent me that touched my heart (Can’t wait to see ya soon, Julie!):

“I don’t think anyone’s truly equipped to go out in front of 1 billion, 2 billion, 3 billion people on an Olympic stage, and you’re scared of your mind, on a 200 by 100 surface of ice. You wonder why you do this because you’re so nervous. On two 10-inch lengths of quarter inch wide steel. “Get me through this, just get me through this.” And you’re to manipulate those edges for 4 and 1/2 minutes, and do triple jumps, and athleticism, and not make a mistake. It’s impossible.

 

But I found a way to be just good enough to win the gold medal. The more I look back on it, I think that’s been unbelievably awesome. Like “that was me?” I always thought if I could be really good on the ice I could become famous. But I think I’m probably more known now for my health problems than I am for anything I ever did on skates.

 

When I was very little, I suffered from a disease that stopped me from growing. I was in and out of hospitals for years and I was never really home.

And so what ended up happening was I came back from being in and out hospitals and I ended up doing the skating club thing just by accident. And I found skating, which kind of took on a life of its own.

 

And it progressed and pretty soon I’m competing, pretty soon I’m living away from home. All my role models and the people that were teaching me how to live day-to-day were older skaters. So there was a lot of it that was terrific, but a lot of it that really wasn’t guiding me in any real direction.

 

It wasn’t until I suffered the devastation of my mother losing her battle to cancer that something was awakened in me. I knew I needed something more, something better. I think I needed to have some strength and my mother was my source of strength. When she was living I would disappoint her. But when she when she was gone, I just didn’t ever want to be less than she thought I could be.

 

I was happy to just work, I was happy to just entertain. I’d do well and that was good enough. Skating had given me life as a child and it gave me kind of a strength is an adult. But what was about to happen really changed my life forever.

 

Cancer, it put me into a phase of my life where I just needed to kind of sort it all out. “I just survived something, why?” I survived something that took the most important person in my life off the planet, that was my mother. She died of cancer and I survived. What’s my purpose now? What do I need to do?

 

And a big part of that dust settling was getting with Tracie, and she brought me to the church. She took me to a minister, a man named Ken Durham. And the first thing he said to me, which was extraordinary was, he goes, “you have to understand that Christianity is a faith of history. These things actually happened.”  And I go, “OK, that’s a good starting-off point.” And just study what has happened and see how that resonates in your own life. And it grew, it was like “OK, I get it. “

 

When you survive testicular cancer and you want to start a family, you don’t know what the issues are going to be. And I prayed that I would someday become a father. Tracie and I, we got engaged, and married, and then my son was born nine months and two days after we got married. So I guess there was a plan there.

 

I thought I’d paid my health dues when I had cancer, but this was another whole issue. I have a brain tumor. How do I tell my wife? And we have a 14-month-old son. How do I tell my wife that I have a brain tumor.

 

I had just gotten the news an hour before. I met them at the hotel and she goes, what’s going on? And I said, I have a brain tumor. And she took my hands and without hesitation, she just started to pray. And it was in that moment I knew where I was going to put everything.

 

My trust, my faith, everything. So the most powerful moment in my life. From that moment forward, we just said, “whatever it is, whatever it takes, we’ll face this. “When they’re going to do a biopsy, they tell you we’re going to drill a hole in your head, and then we’re going to take a needle down through your brain, and take a piece of the tumor. They said, “we seem to have found a safe corridor to do this.” And I go, “well I’m not using most of it.” But they tell you all the things that can go wrong in that surgery.

 

And I remember waking up and looked at the clock and it was 10:20. I knew where I was and then the next thing I saw was my wife come in with a smile on the face. She said, “they know what it is.”

 

And they found out that that brain tumor was one that I was born with you, one that I’ve had since birth, which inhibited my growth as a young child. That was the mysterious illness I had that they never diagnosed, that got me into skating.

 

Who would I be without a brain tumor? I’m 5 foot 4, if I were 5′ 8″-if I would have grown those years-5′ 10″, where would I be, who would I do? I could choose to look it as debilitating. I could choose to focus on the suffering. I choose to look at that brain tumor as the greatest gift I could’ve gotten because it made everything else possible.

 

I didn’t see past it this time. I didn’t think I would survive. At one point I was starting to really feel weak. And one nurse in particular, I was up at 3 o’clock in the morning, and I was uncomfortable, and she goes, can I get you anything? And I just said, “no, I’m just a little scared.”

 

And she said, “do you pray?” I said, “yes.” And she said, “what do you say when you pray?” I go,” I just thank God for all the blessings in my life.”

“ Do you ask him for anything?” “No, I just want him to know I’m grateful. I’m grateful. “

 

“Well, who is God to you?”  I said, “well I guess he’s my father.”  “Oh, you’re a father, right?”  “Yes.”  “If one of your children were hurting, wouldn’t you want him to come to you for comfort and strength?” “Yes.”

 

So I changed the way I pray now. I ask, uninhibitedly I ask. I ask to heal. I ask for strength. I ask for courage.

 

I ask for another child. Want to talk about miracles? After surviving a pituitary brain tumor, it’s impossible, practically impossible. I did six injections a week for two years. No luck, we’re not meant to have another child. We gave it to God. A month later we found out that Max was on his way, Miracle Max.

 

When I look back and I see all those little moments in my life where I needed a great deal of strength, I understand that through a strong relationship with Jesus you can endure anything. I just learned that the only true disability in life is a bad attitude. God is there to guide you through the tough spots. God was there every single time, every single time.

 

My name is Scott Hamilton and I am Second.”

http://www.iamsecond.com/seconds/scott-hamilton/#.TyLOInoTpgY.facebook

821. Working on my memorization and meditation:

Psalm 34:4-5

New King James Version (NKJV)

I sought the Lord, and He heard me,
And delivered me from all my fears.
They looked to Him and were radiant,
And their faces were not ashamed.

Comparing some translations and combining them to think about:

I looked for the Lord, I sought Him, I prayed to Him, and He answered me. And He took away all my fears, He delivered me, He freed me.  They looked to Him for help (and I can too) and their faces shined and were radiant with joy. Their faces will never be darkened with the shadow of shame.
 
822. Met a very nice group of people at a cancer support meeting that I attended for the first time last night.  I even won a fun prize that I am saving for a great birthday gift for Joy in June  in a BINGO game that gave ideas about stress relief with each number called)
 
823. Sharon sharing today’s joke that made me laugh  and being so kind to consult her daughter-in-law who is an ENT Dr  on my behalf for some input and ideas on some issues I am having (I saw an ENT locally as well and would appreciate prayer for wisdom and healing of a persistent cough and weird noises that come out of my throat at night–might possibly be laryngopharyngeal reflux caused by the cancer treatments or something else)
 
824. Kathy done with radiation treatments too—yipeeeeee.  Thank you, Lord, You got ub both through!!!!
 
825. My sister-in-law Kelley  having second mastectomy yesterday (prophylactic) with bilateral reconstruction: surgery went well, thank you Lord.
 
826. Gonga deal on yogurt and almond milk yesterday–God’s special provision for some fun variety with the kid’s breakfasts
 
827. Nicholas’ excitement re: voting for the first time yesterday as an 18 year old.  Praise that we can trust the Lord with however the election turns out in November
 

6 thoughts on “Scott Hamilton’s Story

  1. Dear Paula,

    What a marvelous story. Thanks for sharing Scott Hamilton’s words.

    You have a wonderful story also and the Lord is using you to bless many, including me.

    I am believing the Lord for “radiant” health for you.

    Love, Lillie

    Like

  2. Thanks so much for your encouragment, Denise, Nancy Louise, and Lillie and others who have been such a blessing to me.. I appreciate your prayers, encouragement, and friendship very much.
    ((hugs))),
    Paula

    Like

  3. Scott Hamilton is inspiring, but no more so than your own story or my story. Some time I may share with you more of my life’s story but for now I am just celebrating the finish of radiation and waiting for my breast to stop hurting as the skin peels and bleeds. Every day is better than the last and I thank God for that.
    The most blessed consolation that any of us can have from Jesus is to feel His presence when we have been living on trust alone for many years. He gave that to me today. Thank you Jesus. God Bless. Kathy

    Like

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